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Living [Parents].

Living [Parents].

They had the following children.

  M i Living.
  F ii Living.
  F iii Living.

Cormac GORDON [Parents] was born on 20 May 1921 in Kilgarriff, Fairymount, Co. Roscommon. He died on 8 Nov 2009 in Leopardstown, Dublin. He was buried on 11 Nov 2009 in Shanganagh Cemetery, Dublin. Cormac married Maureen HUSSEY on 4 Sep 1951 in Dundrum, Dublin.

Cormac received his secondary school education at Blackrock College in Dublin, where he was a boarder. After leaving school, he joined the army and was stationed in Athlone, Co. Westmeath during 'The Emergency' (as the situation in Ireland was known during World War II). After the war, Cormac joined the civil service and was posted to the Irish Passport Office at the Irish embassy in London. While in London he met his future wife, Maureen Hussey, through Maureen's sister Sheila, who also worked at the Passport Office. Around 1948 he returned to Dublin to work in the Department of Foreign Affairs, by which time Maureen had moved to Dublin from London with her sisters. He later moved to the Department of Labour where he spent the rest of his career, mainly as a negotiator in industrial disputes.

Cormac and Maureen lived for over 40 years at 56 South Avenue, Mount Merrion, Co. Dublin. In 2001, six years after Maureen's death, Cormac moved to a smaller home in Shankill, Co. Dublin.

Note: Cormac's birth date is registered as August 1921; it is actually 20 May 1921.

Maureen HUSSEY [Parents] was born on 5 Jul 1924 in East Acton, London. She died on 19 Mar 1995 in Mount Merrion, Dublin. She was buried in Shanganagh Cemetery, Dublin. Maureen married Cormac GORDON on 4 Sep 1951 in Dundrum, Dublin.

Maureen grew up in Barnes in London. She attended school at a small French convent in Barnes and later went to the Sacred Heart Convent in Hammersmith.

By the time Maureen left school (during World War II), she had decided she wanted to be a nurse. After six months of basic training in a hospital in the Hammersmith area, she was assigned to the Navy and spent most, if not all, of her service-time at a naval base in Sherborne in Dorset.

Maureen's parents, having an Irish background, felt that their children would have a much better life if they were to settle in Ireland, so in 1947 Maureen and her sisters moved to Dublin. Within a short time, Cormac Gordon, a friend of hers whom she had first met in London when he worked in the Irish Passport Office, was back in Dublin, working in the Department of Foreign Affairs. Maureen and Cormac would later marry.

After her arrival in Dublin, Maureen began training as a medical laboratory assistant, and after qualifying, worked mainly in Trinity College and also in Dr. Steeven's Hospital. When her mother became ill, Maureen resigned from her job to care for her.

In her later years, Maureen became an active member of the Labour party; she also devoted more time to writing, a passion of hers since childhood. After her death, family members published two books of her work: a collection of poetry, 'The Tug of the Undertow', and a collection of prose and poetry, 'Into the Wind'.

They had the following children.

  M i Living.
  F ii Living.
  M iii Living.
  M iv Living.
  M v Living.
  M vi Living.
  M vii Living.

Richard (Dick) O'CONNOR [Parents] was born on 23 May 1919 in Kilbaha, Moyvane, Co. Kerry. He died on 9 Aug 1985 in Tralee, Co. Kerry. He was buried on 12 Aug 1985 in New Rath Cemetery, Tralee, Co. Kerry. Richard married Sheila TREACY on 11 Sep 1958 in Limerick.

Dick was also known as Richie. After leaving school he went to Maynooth college to study for the priesthood. Dick eventually decided not to complete his religious studies and left Maynooth after three years with a BA degree. After spending a couple of years working on the family farm he went to University College Dublin and graduated in 1949 with an Agricultural Science degree. He later became an advisor with the Department of Agriculture in Co. Limerick and later in Tralee, Co. Kerry.

Sheila TREACY [Parents] was born on 27 Jul 1923 in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. She died on 5 Jul 2012 in Dublin. Sheila married Richard (Dick) O'CONNOR on 11 Sep 1958 in Limerick.

The name on Sheila's certificate of baptism is "Julia Anna Tracey" (it is Sheila Treacy on her birth certificate).

With her sister, Jo-Ann, Sheila trained as a nurse at the Withington Hospital in Manchester, both qualifying in 1944. Sheila subsequently worked in Brighton (c.1944-c.1949), Moorfields Eye Hospital in London (c.1950-c.1953), Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital in Dublin (c.1953-c.1954) and the Regional Hospital in Limerick (c.1954-1958). She was a specialist in opthalmic work.

Sheila and her husband, Dick, met in 1958 in the Regional Hospital in Limerick where she was working and where Dick was visiting a patient (Ann Wall?) who may also have been a friend of Sheila's and who introduced them. They married about six months later. Sheila gave up her career upon her marriage, as many woman did in Ireland at the time.

For most of her married life Sheila lived at 9 Lisbeg, Tralee, Co. Kerry. In 1986, following Dick's death, she moved to Dublin where she lived for 26 years at 31 Lansdowne Village, Sandymount.

They had the following children.

  F i Living.
  M ii Living.
  M iii Living.

Stephen HUSSEY [Parents] was born on 25 Jul 1895 in Hammersmith, London. He died on 7 Sep 1978 in Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. He was buried in Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin. Stephen married Mary Brigid RYAN on 28 Aug 1922 in Bagenalstown, Co. Carlow.

Stephen grew up in Hammersmith, Kensington and Chelsea. Money was short, and he had to leave school at the age of 11 or 12 to help financially in the upbringing of his younger brothers and sisters. He is listed, aged 15, in the 1911 census as a builder's clerk.

In 1914, at the beginning of World War I, Stephen joined the Royal Engineers Regiment of the British Army - the 'sappers', as they were known - and was sent to France. Sappers endured the most atrocious conditions and were always the last to leave an area when a retreat was taking place, blowing up roads and bridges behind them so as to slow up pursuit by enemy forces. During one such British evacuation, Stephen carried a wounded man to safety on his back, under gunfire, and was awarded the Military Medal.

After the war, Stephen was trained as a builder by his grandfather, Thomas Hussey, and his uncle, Will Hussey. Stephen later formed a partnership with a Mr. Worman (Worman and Hussey), eventually setting up his own building company, Hussey Bros. (Builders) Ltd., on Queensway, Bayswater, London, with his brothers, Martin and Austin. The company was mostly involved in the building of churches, schools and convents, and for many years, Hussey Bros. had a maintenance contract with Westminster Cathedral. During World War II, once the German air assault on London started, the brothers worked mostly under official government contract on emergency repair and safety building work. After the war, the company built several modern churches.

In 1947, Stephen and his wife, Mary, decided that their daughters would be better off living in Ireland, and so the girls moved to Dublin, the plan being that Stephen and Mary would initially remain in London and eventually retire to Dublin. Stephen and Mary sold their home in Barnes, moved into a flat over the premises of Hussey Bros. in Bayswater, and  purchased a house on Roebuck Road in Clonskeagh for their daughters. However, on an extended visit to the girls in Dublin Mary became ill and died without ever returning to London.

After Mary's death, Stephen visited Dublin more and more frequently. In 1957, with Maureen married, and Una and Brigie engaged to be married, he decided to sell the house on Roebuck Road, and a smaller house on Cedarmount Road in Mount Merrion was purchased. In the 1960s Stephen retired to Dublin, and for the remainder of his life he lived with Sheila at 14 Cedarmount Road.

Stephen died of myocardial ischaemia with atherosclerosis, also carcinoma of the stomach, at St. Michael's Hospital, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.

Mary Brigid RYAN [Parents] was born on 24 Mar 1898 in Garryhill, Co. Carlow. She was christened on 27 Mar 1898 in Bagenalstown, Co. Carlow. She died on 18 Nov 1950 in 'Ui Breasail', Roebuck Road, Clonskeagh, Co. Dublin. She was buried in Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin. Mary married Stephen HUSSEY on 28 Aug 1922 in Bagenalstown, Co. Carlow.

Sponsors at Mary's christening were Gerald Kearney and Clare O'Reilly.

Mary was educated at the Loreto Secondary School on Dublin's St. Stephen's Green. After leaving school, Mary went to England and joined the Post Office Section of the British Civil Service in the Brook Green/Kensington area of London.

Mary and her London-born future husband, Stephen Hussey, met at a local dance in west London. In comparision to his six-foot frame, five-foot-tall Mary was tiny. In 1921, about a year before their marriage, Stephen visited Ireland for the first time when Mary brought him to meet her family in Co. Carlow. After they married, Mary and Stephen lived in East Acton, and later at 12 Ullswater Road (which Stephen designed and built) in Barnes in London.

Around 1948, after her eldest three daughters had moved to Ireland, Mary brought Brigie, the youngest, to Dublin to join her sisters. Mary's plan was to help her daughters settle in to the new home she and Stephen and just bought for them in Clonskeagh (named 'Ui Breasail' by Mary after the mythological island of Celtic folklore) after which she would return to London. However, while in Ireland she began to feel unwell and it was discovered she had cancer. Sadly, she never made it back to London, and died in Dublin in November 1950 aged only 52.

The cause of Mary's death was "carcinoma of colon (18 months)" and "metastasis of ovaries" (nine months)"

They had the following children.

  F i Maureen HUSSEY was born on 5 Jul 1924. She died on 19 Mar 1995.
  F ii
Sheila HUSSEY was born on 2 Jan 1927 in East Acton, London. She died on 27 Jun 2003 in Mount Merrion, Dublin. She was buried on 30 Jun 2003 in Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin.

Sheila grew up in Barnes in London where she was educated at a small French convent about a mile from her home. Barnes was heavily bombed during World War II and Sheila and her family spent much time in the air-raid shelter built by her father under the garage of their home.

Sheila had an interesting encounter during World War II: one afternoon, having returned from school, Sheila was sent by her mother to run some errands in Hammersmith. She was waiting at a bus stop in Barnes and, as usual, there were many army vehicles passing by. One of them, a large U.S. Army car with flags, stopped and a large, middle-aged officer sitting in the back of the vehicle and sporting an impressive array of medals, offered Sheila a lift. Although she may have been told by her parents never to accept a lift from a stranger, Sheila hopped in beside the driver and on the short trip to Hammersmith Broadway she and the army man in the back chatted about school and her favourite subjects before being dropped off in Hammersmith. It was only the next day, when she looked at the front page of the newspaper and saw a photograph of the same officer who had offered her the lift, that Sheila realised she had met Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower.

After leaving school, Sheila started work in the Irish Passport Office at the Irish Embassy in London. Some time later, Sheila acted, unknowingly, as a matchmaker for two of her sisters: a group of young Irish civil servants had been sent from Dublin to augment the staff at the Irish Passport Office, and among them were Cormac Gordon and Michael Roantree. Sheila's mother, remembering how lonely she had felt when she had first arrived in London from Ireland, told Sheila to invite the newcomers to tea the following Sunday. And that was how Sheila's sister Maureen met her future husband, Cormac. Another sister, Una, would later marry Michael's brother Tom. Sheila herself never married.

After Sheila moved to Dublin in 1947 with her sisters, she worked briefly in advertising and then moved on to publishing and some freelance journalism. She then spent a number of years in the now-defunct Irish News Agency, after which she joined Coras Trachtála (the Irish Export Board) and worked for many years in public relations and press work. She lived on Cedarmount Road, Mount Merrion, Co. Dublin and in her retirement became an active member of the Green party.
  F iii Una HUSSEY was born on 1 Oct 1928. She died on 29 Sep 1995.
  F iv Living.

John (Jack Bill) O'CONNOR [Parents] was born on 25 May 1876 in Kilbaha, Moyvane, Co. Kerry. He was christened on 5 Jun 1876 in Moyvane, Co. Kerry. He died on 8 Nov 1959 in probably Kilbaha, Moyvane, Co. Kerry. He was buried in Old Cemetery, Knockanure, Co. Kerry. John married Catherine (Babe) SHANAHAN on 4 Mar 1916 in Newtownsandes (Moyvane), Co. Kerry.

The sponsors at Jack's baptism were (what appears to be) William Hanrahan and Johanna Hanrahan. Jack was known as Jack Bill because his father's name was Bill (William). This followed a local naming custom by which people (females included) often had their father's name added to their first names in order to distinguish them from others of the same name in the area.    

Jack Bill ran the O'Connor family farm in Kilbaha.

Catherine (Babe) SHANAHAN [Parents] was born on 10 Nov 1891 in Kilbaha, Moyvane, Co. Kerry. She was christened on 14 Nov 1891 in Moyvane, Co. Kerry. She died on 24 Jan 1986 in Lisaniskea, Knockanure, Co. Kerry. She was buried in Old Cemetery, Knockanure, Co. Kerry. Catherine married John (Jack Bill) O'CONNOR on 4 Mar 1916 in Newtownsandes (Moyvane), Co. Kerry.

Babe's baptismal sponsors were Nicholas Madden and Mary Collins.

Babe was only about 13 when her mother died. She helped raise her younger siblings.

Marriage Notes:

Witnesses to the marriage of Jack Bill and Babe were Patrick Finucane and Ellie Shanahan (probably Babe's sister).

According to their son Dick, the marriage of Jack Bill and Babe was arranged, a practice common at the time.

They had the following children.

  M i William (Willie) O'CONNOR was born in 1917. He died on 23 Jul 1966.
  F ii Mary O'CONNOR was born in 1918. She died on 14 Nov 1996.
  M iii Richard (Dick) O'CONNOR was born on 23 May 1919. He died on 9 Aug 1985.
  F iv
Hannah (Sr. Patricia) O'CONNOR was born on 19 May 1921 in Kilbaha, Moyvane, Co. Kerry. She died on 29 Dec 2008 in Cork. She was buried on 31 Dec 2008 in St. Oliver's Cemetery, Cork.

Sr. Patricia was a sister in the Bon Secours order. She lived in Cork.

Living.

Living [Parents].

They had the following children.

  F i
Marielle BOURKE was born on 11 Jun 1991 in Dublin. She died on 11 Jun 1991 in Dublin. She was buried in New Cemetery, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary.
  F ii
Julienne BOURKE was born on 11 Jun 1991 in Dublin. She died on 11 Jun 1991 in Dublin. She was buried in New Cemetery, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary.
  F iii Living.
  F iv Living.

Thomas Noel (Noel) TREACY [Parents] was born on 14 Dec 1926 in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. He died on 23 May 2009 in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. Thomas married Ellen (Ella) MEANY on 27 Jun 1957 in Clogheen registration district, Co. Tipperary.

Noel ran the family fuel business in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Throughout his life he was very involved in local activities, including Carrick-on-Suir Musical Society productions, working with the St. Vincent de Paul Society, and playing at Castleview Lawn Tennis Club. Noel was still playing tennis regularly until shortly before his death at the age of 82.

Ellen (Ella) MEANY [Parents] was born on 27 Mar 1929 in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. She died on 9 Apr 2011 in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Ellen married Thomas Noel (Noel) TREACY on 27 Jun 1957 in Clogheen registration district, Co. Tipperary.

They had the following children.

  F i Living.
  F ii Living.
  M iii Living.
  M iv Living.
  F v Living.

Thomas Joseph TREACY [Parents] was born on 13 Apr 1881 in Murgasty, Co. Tipperary. He was christened about 13 Apr 1881 in Tipperary. He died on 13 Apr 1969 in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. He was buried in New Cemetery, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Thomas married Ellen O'SULLIVAN on 12 Jan 1915 in Church of S.S. Peter And Paul, Cork.

The sponsors at Thomas's baptism was Sarah Carew, probably his aunt. There was no other sponsor listed on the baptismal record.

Thomas began his career working at the gasworks in Tipperary town; according to the 1911 census he was a "gas account collector". On 28 September 1914 he took over the management of the gasworks in Carrick-on-Suir (located on the Quay), eventually buying the Carrick gasworks from the owner, Mr. Anderson. I am unsure as to the year of purchase but it would probably have been during the mid- or late 1930s as it is known that Mr. Anderson still owned the Carrick gasworks in 1933.

Difficulties in getting parts from England for gasworks repairs during World War II led to problems in manufacturing gas at the Carrick works so Thomas decided to switch to the making of charcoal and in 1942 the large gasometers were dismantled. The business eventually concentrated on the sales of coal, coke and briquettes, and subsequently incorporated sales of gas stoves and heaters.

Ellen O'SULLIVAN [Parents] was born on 24 Oct 1887 in Glynn, Mourneabbey, Co. Cork. She was christened on 25 Oct 1887 in Analeentha Church, Mourneabbey, Co. Cork. She died on 18 Sep 1972 in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. She was buried in New Cemetery, Carrick-on-Suir. Ellen married Thomas Joseph TREACY on 12 Jan 1915 in Church of S.S. Peter And Paul, Cork.

According to information from the Mallow Heritage Centre, the sponsors at Ellen's baptism were Cornelius Sweeney and Julia Curtin. It is believed Cornelius Sweeney was a neighbour of the Sullivans and it is thought he was married to one of Caheraveelane Sullivans who were related to Ellen. A granddaughter of Cornelius would later marry Ellen's brother Denis. Julia Curtin, the second sponsor, had been a neighbour of the Sullivans when they lived in Ballyknockane. Julia would later marry Sean O'Looney; they emigrated to the United States and had 12 children. Valuable information on the Sullivan family, for which I am very grateful, came in November 2003 from 96-year-old Patrick, known as Pats, Curtin, a nephew of Julia's who lived in Ballyknockane with one of his daughters. Sadly, Pats died in September 2004.

It is thought that Ellen, who was also known as Nellie, had some domestic training and subsequently became a parlour maid. I am told that she met her husband, Thomas Treacy, in Tipperary town where they were both working (Thomas worked at the gasworks in the town). Based on this information I believe I have located a 1911 census record for Ellen. An Ellen Sullivan, aged 24 (although our Ellen was actually 23 years of age at the time of the census) and born in Co. Cork, was working as a parlour maid at the home of law agent George Hugh Chetwood Townsend in Cordangan, just a couple of miles south of Tipperary town. It was a large house and, along with Ellen, six other servants are listed.

However, according to Ellen's marriage certificate, her residence at the time (January 1915) was Lavitt's Quay, Cork but it is not known how she came to live in Cork after apparently having met Thomas. She did have an uncle, Mike Doody, who was living on Lavitt's Quay at the time of the 1911 census. Perhaps he was still there in 1915 and she was staying with him or working for him? Or perhaps she wanted to get married in Cork and therefore used her uncle's address to fulfil a possible residency requirement.

It is thought that Ellen - or perhaps Thomas, her husband - may have been related to a Hewitt family which included Patrick (1897-1979), a Holy Ghost priest who did missionary work in Tanganyika (now part of Tanzania), his brother James (1900-1974), a Holy Ghost brother who worked at Blackrock College in Dublin as a ground staff supervisor, and their sister Biddy who married a J.J. Healy and lived in Carrick-on-Suir. Other relatives of Ellen or Thomas included a couple who lived near Flamborough Head in Yorkshire in the 1940s. All we know of this couple is that the husband was in the Merchant Navy. Could they have been Ellen's aunt Hannah (O'Sullivan) and her husband Harry Williams, who was in the Merchant Navy? Further information would be most welcome.   

They had the following children.

  M i
Patrick TREACY was born in between 1915 and 1920 in Waterford. He died in between 1915 and 1920 in Waterford.

Patrick died as an infant. I am told he was born and died in a nursing home in Waterford city. However, I can fine no trace of a birth or death certificate for him (in both Carrick-on-Suir and Waterford registration districts).

Note: It is surprising Patrick was not named Thomas as it was traditional at the time to name the eldest son after his paternal grandfather. Searches have been carried out for birth and death certificates for a Thomas Treacy, just in case (in both Carrick-on-Suir and Waterford registration districts), but nothing was found.
  F ii
Mary Frances (Joan) TREACY was born on 20 Aug 1920 in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. She died on 23 Oct 2003 in Haywards Heath, West Sussex. She was buried in Shanganagh Cemetery, Dublin.

The name on Joan's birth certificate is Mary Frances and on her baptismal certificate it is Mary Bridget. However, she was called Joan by her family, although her nursing records are in the name of Mary Frances. She used the name is name for most of her life until after her retirement when she changed it to Jo-Ann.  

Jo-Ann trained as a nurse in Manchester, qualifying in 1944. She had always wanted to travel so, following a number of years of general and industrial nursing in the UK, she joined the QARANC (Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps) in 1952. Her first foreign posting was to Benghazi in Libya in 1953, followed by Cyprus in 1954.

Jo-Ann returned to England in 1956 and, while working at Shorncliffe Military Hospital, decided she wanted to specialise in nurse training. She embarked on a two-year course in Hull University, obtaining a Diploma in Nurse Training and Education in 1959, after which she spent many years training student nurses overseas during postings to Germany, Hong Kong and Singapore. In 1963, while serving in Hong Kong, she was awarded an Associate Royal Red Cross (ARRC) medal for exceptional services in military nursing.

Following her permanent return to England in 1970 Jo-Ann continued to train nurses at the military hospitals in Tidworth, Colchester, Aldershot and Woolwich. She retired in 1975 as Director of Studies at Woolwich and as acting colonel. She lived briefly in Brighton following her retirement before settling in Henfield in West Sussex. Jo-Ann never married although it is believed that she was engaged in the 1950s, possibly to a military doctor. Sadly, the marriage never took place because apparently her fiancé was killed in a bomb explosion in Cyprus, about which we have no details.

  F iii Sheila TREACY was born on 27 Jul 1923. She died on 5 Jul 2012.
  M iv Thomas Noel (Noel) TREACY was born on 14 Dec 1926. He died on 23 May 2009.

Living [Parents].

Living.

They had the following children.

  F i Living.
  F ii Living.

Living.

Living [Parents].

They had the following children.

  M i Living.
  F ii Living.
  M iii Living.

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